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Andre77ab

Set dead zone in axis

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I've printed the latest manual of v.3.60, assign picth and roll axis via FS9.1 (null zone 0 and sensit. 100, as specified in the manual, to avoid every time to delete inside fs this axis if selected via FSUIPS, but fs automatically assign those at fs at the next restart :shock: ) than calibrated inside FSUIPC, modify the response curve more flatten in the center to reduce sensitivity for little mouvement, but how I can add a little null zone? I've check the filter option, but still to sensitive

Andy

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I

(null zone 0 and sensit. 100, as specified in the manual, to avoid every time to delete inside fs this axis if selected via FSUIPS, but fs automatically assign those at fs at the next restart :shock: )

Unfortunately you are mixing up two different things. You need the FS sensitivity at max and null zone at min in order that FS not only provides the axis values, but provides the full range of axis values.

The sensitivity value is used as a kind of divisor. The higher it is the shorter the range of values from the axis, and the more coarse the calibration.

The null zone in FS merely makes an initial part of the axis unusable, so reducing the number of possible values still further.

When calibrating (not assigning) in FSUIPC you don't want either of these reductions to occur, as they detract from the accuracy and precision with which you can calibrate.

If you want to actually assign axes in FS, then you probably would need to disable joysticks in FS altogether as, yes, FS does have the habit of assigning axes automatically. I suppose an alternative would be to set the FS sensitivity to zero, so that the axis, assigned in FSUIPC, wouldn't have any affect in FS first.

than calibrated inside FSUIPC, modify the response curve more flatten in the center to reduce sensitivity for little mouvement, but how I can add a little null zone? I've check the filter option, but still to sensitive

FSUIPC's "centre" null zone is achieved by following the step-by-step instructions for calibration. There are TWO (2) centre values. They need to be different, i.e. relate to different points on your joystick axis. The whole of that little central range is then the "null zone" -- i.e. it has no sensitivity whatsoever, only sending '0' back to FS. This is what "null" means -- "nothing"! Please re-calibrate and follow the instructions step by step.

The slope is used to affect sensitivity in FSUIPC. It is very different from FS's method in that, whilst it can reduce the sensitivty in the centre, at the same time it increases it at the extremes so that the full deflections are still usable.

Take care not to use the "inverse" slopes -- those increase centre sensitivity whilst reducing it at the extremes. (One good use of that is for more sensitive steering via the steering tiller facility in FSUIPC version 3.617, available above).

The filter facility is intended to reduce jitter, it has nothing whatsoever to do with sensitivity or null zones. It applies a low pass digital filter to the values, that's all.

Pete

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Thanks a lot Peter, I use CH devices (joke, throttle quad, pedals usb) and FS9.1 as a training device, so I need to obtain the max I can; saying that which is the best way to reach that result? (axis assignment speaking, fs or FSUIPC without any restart get mad to fixing automatic fs assignment?)

Secondly the sens response is reached by changed the curve (not negatively as you wrote before right?), so getting the center part more flat :idea:

Andy

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Thanks a lot Peter, I use CH devices (joke, throttle quad, pedals usb) and FS9.1 as a training device, so I need to obtain the max I can; saying that which is the best way to reach that result? (axis assignment speaking, fs or FSUIPC without any restart get mad to fixing automatic fs assignment?)

The purpose of providing direct axis assignment in FS was really to allow clever things to be done, like assignment to axes not supported directly by FS (reversers, steering tiller, rudder and aileron trims, and so on) -- previously you'd need to "pinch2 a real FS axis and assign it to one of these in the FSUIPC INI file. A bit messy to say the least.

The other major purposes of FSUIPC assignments was to allow different assignments for different aircraft types -- for instance, to support those with a separate prop and jet or prop and helo control system -- and to provide direct "raw" value assignments for programmable hardware systems such as EPIC to directly control other FS values.

I really think it is overkill for what you need. Just do a full and proper calibration, with null zone and suitable slope, all in FSUIPC after assigning axes in FS and setting FS's sensitivity to max and null zone to min. The step by step instructions in the FSUIPC manual should get you exactly what you want.

Secondly the sens response is reached by changed the curve (not negatively as you wrote before right?)

Go take a look. You can move the slider both ways from the linear (straight) default response. One way is less sensitive in the centre (more horizontal), the other is more sensitive in the centre (more vertical). In both cases the compensation is then the opposite in the extremes. If you look at it it becomes obvious.

Regards

Pete

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