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USA Registration numbers


rlgpilot1
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I spend most of my FSX time flying small GA aircraft into and out of smaller airports (non-airline) in the USA. I have noticed many GA aircraft that have invalid USA registrations (N-numbers). Per the SDK, a USA N-number should be:

United States N####* (Any fixed digit or letter or hyphen will appear in the tail number.)

# = randomly chosen digit: 0-9

* = random letter or digit, other than letters ‘O’ or ‘I’

I have seen many aircraft in the database with N-numbers like the following:

N-CSOA C182S-MY00 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-CSME C172-GA4 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-1CSMF RV6a-GA5 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-CTKE A36-GA0 (more than 2 alpha characters)

These are all illegal N-numbers per the SDK...the actual FAA requirements are a bit different:

How to Properly Form an N-Number:

N-Numbers consist of a series of alphanumeric characters. U.S. registration numbers may not exceed five characters in addition to the standard U.S. registration prefix letter N. These characters may be:

* One to five numbers (N12345) (See below for one and two number registrations, special for FAA use only)

* One to four numbers followed by one letter (N1234Z)

* One to three numbers followed by two letters (N123AZ)

To avoid confusion with the numbers one and zero, the letters I and O are not to be used.

Other Requirements

* An N-Number may not begin with zero. You must precede the first zero in an N-Number with any number 1 through 9. For example, N01Z is not valid.

* Registration numbers N1 through N99 are strictly reserved for FAA internal use.

* The FAA no longer issues numbers beginning with NC, NX, NR, or NL. On some older aircraft, these numbers may be displayed in accordance with FAR Part 45.22.

Additional examples in the database which violate the FAA rules are:

N-001CD RV6a-GA6 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

N-001CE C182S-GA1 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

N-001CN PA28-GA1 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

In the interest of accuracy, I have considered undertaking the (somewhat daunting) task of updating the several hundred (perhaps thousand) incorrect GA N-numbers in my version of the database. My concern is that when you create the next update and issue a new database, I will lose all that work and have to do it again. So, I seem to have 2 basic questions here:

1. Is there a way to modify your version of the database so that the next update will have the correct N-numbers?

2. If not, is there an easy way I can add my own corrections to your database in future updates and not have to do each registration manually?

Thanks for your thoughts.

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I spend most of my FSX time flying small GA aircraft into and out of smaller airports (non-airline) in the USA. I have noticed many GA aircraft that have invalid USA registrations (N-numbers). Per the SDK, a USA N-number should be:

United States N####* (Any fixed digit or letter or hyphen will appear in the tail number.)

# = randomly chosen digit: 0-9

* = random letter or digit, other than letters ‘O’ or ‘I’

I have seen many aircraft in the database with N-numbers like the following:

N-CSOA C182S-MY00 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-CSME C172-GA4 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-1CSMF RV6a-GA5 (more than 2 alpha characters)

N-CTKE A36-GA0 (more than 2 alpha characters)

These are all illegal N-numbers per the SDK...the actual FAA requirements are a bit different:

How to Properly Form an N-Number:

N-Numbers consist of a series of alphanumeric characters. U.S. registration numbers may not exceed five characters in addition to the standard U.S. registration prefix letter N. These characters may be:

* One to five numbers (N12345) (See below for one and two number registrations, special for FAA use only)

* One to four numbers followed by one letter (N1234Z)

* One to three numbers followed by two letters (N123AZ)

To avoid confusion with the numbers one and zero, the letters I and O are not to be used.

Other Requirements

* An N-Number may not begin with zero. You must precede the first zero in an N-Number with any number 1 through 9. For example, N01Z is not valid.

* Registration numbers N1 through N99 are strictly reserved for FAA internal use.

* The FAA no longer issues numbers beginning with NC, NX, NR, or NL. On some older aircraft, these numbers may be displayed in accordance with FAR Part 45.22.

Additional examples in the database which violate the FAA rules are:

N-001CD RV6a-GA6 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

N-001CE C182S-GA1 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

N-001CN PA28-GA1 (first digit after the N cannot be 0)

In the interest of accuracy, I have considered undertaking the (somewhat daunting) task of updating the several hundred (perhaps thousand) incorrect GA N-numbers in my version of the database. My concern is that when you create the next update and issue a new database, I will lose all that work and have to do it again. So, I seem to have 2 basic questions here:

1. Is there a way to modify your version of the database so that the next update will have the correct N-numbers?

2. If not, is there an easy way I can add my own corrections to your database in future updates and not have to do each registration manually?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Thanks for this detailed explanation. This has been mostly taken account of - the only interaction the user has with the numbers is that he hears them from ATC - and you can check that the minus is using a minus sign which is not spoken. So while these "-" show up in the database, where they don't bother anybody, they do not appear in real simulation.

The problem, if ommitting the minus signs for those countries that do not have them is, that ids no longer are unique, and it is not in all cases straight forward to resolve them. So since many years now, for the necessary simplification of the database part MyTraffic keeps the signs in database process and just ensures ATC does not call them.

Now about the leading Zeros, that is something I didn't check yet if ATC speaks them or not, did you ever hear them spoken?

Some aircraft use international type character sequences behind the N. These I could try to fix somewhere in the process.

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Thanks for this detailed explanation. This has been mostly taken account of - the only interaction the user has with the numbers is that he hears them from ATC - and you can check that the minus is using a minus sign which is not spoken. So while these "-" show up in the database, where they don't bother anybody, they do not appear in real simulation.

The problem, if ommitting the minus signs for those countries that do not have them is, that ids no longer are unique, and it is not in all cases straight forward to resolve them. So since many years now, for the necessary simplification of the database part MyTraffic keeps the signs in database process and just ensures ATC does not call them.

Now about the leading Zeros, that is something I didn't check yet if ATC speaks them or not, did you ever hear them spoken?

Some aircraft use international type character sequences behind the N. These I could try to fix somewhere in the process.

Thanks for the quick response!

I have no problem with the minus sign, as you say, it is not spoken and actually helps with the readability of the N number. (N-12345 is just fine, I actually prefer it.)

The leading zero(s) are spoken by ATC just like any other number (for instance, N-008GG is pronounced by ATC as "November zero zero eight Golf Golf"). This is what first cued me to the error, as the first digit after the N (and the minus sign) cannot be a zero...neither can it be a letter (and of course, letters "O" and "I" are always a no-no).

The international-type sequences (using 3, 4 or 5 letters) are not valid for USA registrations either, so should not follow an "N-" registration.

Is there an easy way for me to correct these invalid registrations without doing it manually, one at a time from within My Traffic X? Like maybe export aircraft files from the database, correct the registration errors (maybe using Notepad, probably faster), then import the corrected aircraft files back into the database? Do I need to delete the erroneous registrations from the database before I try to import the corrections or can they be over-written?

Hope this helps to clarify things!

Thanks for your great support.

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Thanks for the quick response!

I have no problem with the minus sign, as you say, it is not spoken and actually helps with the readability of the N number. (N-12345 is just fine, I actually prefer it.)

The leading zero(s) are spoken by ATC just like any other number (for instance, N-008GG is pronounced by ATC as "November zero zero eight Golf Golf"). This is what first cued me to the error, as the first digit after the N (and the minus sign) cannot be a zero...neither can it be a letter (and of course, letters "O" and "I" are always a no-no).

The international-type sequences (using 3, 4 or 5 letters) are not valid for USA registrations either, so should not follow an "N-" registration.

Is there an easy way for me to correct these invalid registrations without doing it manually, one at a time from within My Traffic X? Like maybe export aircraft files from the database, correct the registration errors (maybe using Notepad, probably faster), then import the corrected aircraft files back into the database? Do I need to delete the erroneous registrations from the database before I try to import the corrections or can they be over-written?

Hope this helps to clarify things!

Thanks for your great support.

I think it is better I take care for this for the next version, which is just before beta testing. Not quite clear if this is possible using the editor as it exists in bulk, or if I have to add a few (hundred) lines of code there.

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I think it is better I take care for this for the next version, which is just before beta testing. Not quite clear if this is possible using the editor as it exists in bulk, or if I have to add a few (hundred) lines of code there.

Thanks...I'll stand by for the next version.

Hopefully, it's an easy fix...

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