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whiggy

AoA to high at final approach.

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Hello!

On every final approach, the autopilot is holding a very high AoA. Is this normal?
It's to high to look out to the runway.

Could it be a CG problem regarding the load manager?

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The pitch angles were verified by RW pilots and stated as correct.  See -

Even so the flight dynamics are being re-evaluated by the test team for the upcoming SP1. See -

 

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The problem is not the eyepoint (I changed before I made my first flight 🙂
But the AoA is to steep (nose up) in final app phase.

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Seen others saying the same. Maybe its a misconception of how the aircraft should behave. It feels a bit different to a 319 or 738 for instance.

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8 hours ago, whiggy said:

 

Yes!

Using this tool: https://library.avsim.net/esearch.php?DLID=178498&CatID=genutils

But also tried with tables. Same values.

Use this version: https://forums.x-plane.org/index.php?/files/file/39522-e-jets-speed-calculator/ works with the e-jets v3 as well. Basically an update of the one you're using now

Also a 10* angle of attack on final is normal and has been confirmed by real pilots of the e-jets

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The original poster is correct, but he is speaking of deck angle/approach pitch. I see this also in the 175 when flying the proper approach speed. The 175 has a similar deck angle to the DC-10-30 when flown with flaps 5. It is approximately 4.5 on a 3 degree glide slope. The feel there flight model has it at 10 degrees, which is really high for a 3 degree glide slope. 5 degrees is on the high end of the normal approach pitch that you would find. 10 degrees is what you would find on delta wing type aircraft. These type mainly use the wing for lift, which you find to be typical on a concorde with it's 13 degree deck angle. The pitch of an aircraft during the different phases of flight is an accurate indicator of proper lift of the wing and it's lifting devices. 

If you need to verify an aircraft's approach pitch, go to it's flight crew training manual and it will display the aircraft's landing geometry. This picture will display view point, glide slope antennae location, no flare touch down point, threshold crossing height, etc for landing flaps at VREF. It will display the body angle (pitch) at different glide slope angles. You may also find touch down pitches at VREF to VREF minus 10. Keep in mind that these pitch angles are at VREF. An aircraft's pitch will change 1 degree per 5 knots. You can also find pitch values in the unreliable airspeed section of the QRH or flight manual. These charts will give you pitch and power values to use when your pitot system or airspeed indications are not reliable. Keep in mind that the approach section of unreliable airspeed charts are created at VREF plus 10 for safety margin.

Below is a link to a good video of the 175 on approach. You will notice that the nose reference on the PFD is just below and touching the 5 degree line on the ADI section. When I flew DC10s, we had the same attitude with flaps 35(4.5 pitch). Note that the airspeed is 137 which means his VREF is 132. 132 equates to a weight around 73,000 pounds or so. Also note the pitch behavior at the two different flap settings(3/5) and speeds. When I fly the approach in P3D, I am getting about 9.5 on the PFD ADI section. I hope this helps.  

   

Edited by g5flyer
test

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