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Basic reverser question


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Pete,

One thing I'm not grasping with the reverser.

I have the CH Yoke with the three throttles.

You've got reverser set to the right-most one which I believe is mixture.

Wouldn't reverser most normally be hooked to the main throttle? Full back on the throttle being reverse? I'm pretty sure I can do it any way I want but I'm trying this time around to be more realistic in my approach.

I suspect I'll mainly be flying a CRJ for quite a long time or my Dash 8 if PSS ever changes their mind to fix it for FSX.

If it's tied to mixture, the problem I have is that throttle, when cut to zero, cuts off all the engines. How would I get past that into reverser mode and not have it kill the engines?

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You've got reverser set to the right-most one which I believe is mixture.

Well, it is optionally set to the mixture, yes. It is configurable of course (and INI file option -- you can use any otherwise unused FS axis control)). And it isn't actually set unless you set it in the calibration screen.

Wouldn't reverser most normally be hooked to the main throttle? Full back on the throttle being reverse?

Of course you can do it that way if you wish. The choice is entirely yours. On a full throttle quadrant the reversing levers, although attached to the throttle levers, are separate "axes", but if you are short of levers you do it whichever way suits you.

The addition of separate reverser calibration in FSUIPC (both the single one and the 4 separate ones for up to 4 engines) were later additions. Up until then everyone calibrated a reverse section of the main throttle levers, with idle as a sort of "centre".

If it's tied to mixture, the problem I have is that throttle, when cut to zero, cuts off all the engines.

You don't seem to understand. There's nothing "tied" to mixture, that only happens if you set it. Just do not "Set" the reverser (press "Reset" if you have already) and it is the mixture again!!!

And engines don't "cut off" if you reduce the thrust to idle, they simply idle. Where have you read that sort of stuff?

If you want to calibrate throttles with a reverse section, just follow the detailed instructions provided. I am not about to reproduce sections of the User Guide here. Please do refer to it!

Pete

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And engines don't "cut off" if you reduce the thrust to idle, they simply idle. Where have you read that sort of stuff?

It's what happens on my setup prior to doing anything with FSUIPC. The right-most throttle, when brought fully down, kills the engines.

I also wasn't asking for instructions. I'm simply curious about how these work in real life. I'd like to mimic that.

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It's what happens on my setup prior to doing anything with FSUIPC. The right-most throttle, when brought fully down, kills the engines.

Something very wrong there then. Are you sure that's a throttle and not a mixture? If you lean the mixture completely that will kill the relevant engine for sure (or all engines for the non-specific mixture control) -- in both a prop and a jet. In a jet the mixture is used in FS as the idle/cutoff lever.

I think you have definitely got it assigned as a mixture lever, not a throttle. It is the only explanation.

I also wasn't asking for instructions. I'm simply curious about how these work in real life. I'd like to mimic that.

depends on the aircraft. Jet airliners tend to have reversing levers which can only be operated after pulling the throttles back to idle.

Pete

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I guess I didn't describe it well.

At least on my CH Yoke, the Left control is Throttle. The middle one is prop and the right one is mixture.

When I go into FSUIPC and go to the reverser section it's reading the rightmost lever by default. As mentioned the right one is mixture.

That's why I was asking about it as it seemed a bit confusing to me why the default would be on the mixture control when reducing it would cut off the engine.

Not a big deal in any case. Just pointing out what I'm seeing.

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When I go into FSUIPC and go to the reverser section it's reading the rightmost lever by default. As mentioned the right one is mixture.

Right, as I said. If it is being used as mixture then it will certainly cut the engines when pulled right back! It is NOT a throttle!

That's why I was asking about it as it seemed a bit confusing to me why the default would be on the mixture control when reducing it would cut off the engine.

Oh dear, you still misunderstand what I've been saying, and what the documentation tells you? How? :-(

The mixture IS the mixture!!! You *can* use it as a reverser, via FSUIPC, but only if you tell FSUIPC to so do. It is one option available to you!

In order to use it as a reverser you "Set" it (i.e. press the "Set" button top left in the Reverser section), and calibrate it as a reverser. Then it is no longer a mixture control at all and will instead act as a reverser instead.

Please please do take some time to read the user guide.

Regards

Pete

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Pete,

We're not speaking to the same things here.

I realize 100% of everything you're saying.

This is a case of you knowing your product inside-and-out versus someone who doesn't.

As someone who doesn't I found it confusing that when I brought up FSUIPC the first time and went to the reverser section the first time that the only lever that it saw moving (by default) was the one that is, by default, controlling mixture.

Yes, I realize I can change any of these things.

I'm just saying that it was a bit confusing trying to understand why the default would match the mixture control to the reverser control. Those two controls seem not to go together in any way.

Does that make any more sense?

I've read the documentation. It is not discussing what I am above. It tells me how I can go about making all the changes needed. That's great. Thank you. I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about a first impression here. The defaults, one generally assumes (and you know what they say about assuming) are there usually because that's the best choice. That's what I was trying to figure out.

I don't just change things in any software I use for the heck of it. I generally try to go with the defaults and then, if they just don't work for me, then I'll go about making changes.

I don't believe your choices had anything to do with this. I'm not suggesting there's anything wrong with FSUIPC or the documentation.

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As someone who doesn't I found it confusing that when I brought up FSUIPC the first time and went to the reverser section the first time that the only lever that it saw moving (by default) was the one that is, by default, controlling mixture.

Yes, exactly as documented.

I'm just saying that it was a bit confusing trying to understand why the default would match the mixture control to the reverser control. Those two controls seem not to go together in any way.

There is no reverser axis in FS. I repeat THERE IS NO REVERSER AXIS IN FS!

In order to support a reverser axis I have to "steal" another axis that IS in FS. The aircraft which will have reverser levers do not also have mixture levers, therefore it was and remains a good choice!

In other words, it is precisely because "those two controls seem not to go together in any way" that they make good alternatives. If i had stolen a control which was useful in an aircraft which could use a reverser it would have been very awkward.

Does that make any more sense?

No, not at all. From where I sit you seem to be deliberately persisting in not understanding what I say for no good reason.

Let's end this here and now. It isn't going anywhere at all.

Pete

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